Grand Rapids Second Offense DUI Charges

Have you recently been arrested for Michigan DUI second offense? If this is your second drunk-driving offense within seven years of your last conviction, speak with a skilled DUI defense attorney as quickly as possible. Even though a second offense is classified as a misdemeanor, you may still face increased penalties, such as jail time and fines making it important a Grand Rapids DUI lawyer is contacted as soon as possible.

Building a Defense

If you are like many people, you may believe that just because you were arrested for Michigan DUI second offense, you will automatically be convicted. This is not the case! An experienced defense lawyer may review your case to determine if the police followed proper protocol during your arrest, or if your chemical test results were accurate. If errors were made during your traffic stop or breath testing, your charged may be minimized or even thrown out.

The penalties for a second offense are much more serious than for a first. As stated above, a violation is considered a second offense if it has occurred with seven years of your first DUI conviction. Even out-of-state convictions may be considered during sentencing.

Penalties For a Second Offense

For a Michigan DUI second offense, you may face no fewer than 5 days and no more than 12 months in jail. In addition to jail time, you may be sentenced to between 30 to 90 days of community service and fines ranging from $200 to $1,000.

After a second DUI conviction, your driver’s license may be revoked for at least a year. In order to have your license reinstated, you must satisfy the requirements of the Driver’s License Appeal Division (DLAD) and wait until you are eligible to apply.

While forfeiture of your vehicle is optional, it may be immobilized after your Michigan DUI second offense conviction.

In addition to the criminal penalties that may be imposed for a second conviction, your personal life may be affected. After your auto insurance company learns of your DUI offense, you may be placed in their “high-risk” category. This means that your insurance rates may be raised, or your coverage may be cancelled. In addition, having two misdemeanors on your record may cause problems when you are looking for employment.